Event Title

Lo que el carro cambio: Changing the Performance of Tradition in A Transnational Community

Presenter Information

Rocio León, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 1:30 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 2:30 PM

Abstract

Migrants in the U.S. from Mexico continue to adapt the ways in which they maintain connections to their hometowns. Using oral histories and a transnational approach, this research analyzes the experiences of migrants from the rural town of Toyahua de Abajo, Zacatecas, Mexico and the celebration of La Fiesta de Octubre, an annual festival that occurs in honor of La Virgen del Rosario. I use the festival as a case study to understand how migration has transformed tradition and how migrants build on cultural and religious identities through economic and social engagement with their hometowns.

Notes

Session I, Panel 3: The Maintenance of Tradition, Tongues, and Difference: Case Studies from the U.S. and Mexico
Moderator: Heather Hogan, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences and Professor of History

Major

History

Advisor(s)

Pablo Mitchell, Comparative American Studies; History

Project Mentor(s)

Gina Perez, Comparative American Studies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 1:30 PM Apr 26th, 2:30 PM

Lo que el carro cambio: Changing the Performance of Tradition in A Transnational Community

Science Center, A254

Migrants in the U.S. from Mexico continue to adapt the ways in which they maintain connections to their hometowns. Using oral histories and a transnational approach, this research analyzes the experiences of migrants from the rural town of Toyahua de Abajo, Zacatecas, Mexico and the celebration of La Fiesta de Octubre, an annual festival that occurs in honor of La Virgen del Rosario. I use the festival as a case study to understand how migration has transformed tradition and how migrants build on cultural and religious identities through economic and social engagement with their hometowns.