Event Title

Achievement Goals as a Factor of Homophily

Presenter Information

Katherine Lemoine, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A262

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

In this project, I examine how homophily, the tendency for children to affiliate with similar others, is related to children’s achievement in terms of mastery goals (emphasizing effort and individual improvement) and performance goals (emphasizing ability compared to others). Much of the research in this field indicates that children befriend others similar based on visible characteristics, but I examine whether children affiliate on achievement goals—i.e., a less visible characteristic. Results indicate that third-grade children differ on their achievement goals but there are no sex differences; that is, males and females demonstrate similar patterns of achievement goals, preferring mastery to performance goals. Results concerning achievement goals within friendship groups are in progress.

Notes

Session III, Panel 16: The Well-Tempered Self and Others: Case Studies in Philosophy and Psychology
Moderator: Cindy Frantz, Associate Professor of Psychology

Major

Psychology

Advisor(s)

Cindy Frantz, Psychology

Project Mentor(s)

Travis Wilson, Psychology

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 4:00 PM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Achievement Goals as a Factor of Homophily

Science Center, A262

In this project, I examine how homophily, the tendency for children to affiliate with similar others, is related to children’s achievement in terms of mastery goals (emphasizing effort and individual improvement) and performance goals (emphasizing ability compared to others). Much of the research in this field indicates that children befriend others similar based on visible characteristics, but I examine whether children affiliate on achievement goals—i.e., a less visible characteristic. Results indicate that third-grade children differ on their achievement goals but there are no sex differences; that is, males and females demonstrate similar patterns of achievement goals, preferring mastery to performance goals. Results concerning achievement goals within friendship groups are in progress.