Event Title

Soundin’ National Cultcha: Creolization, Migration, and Jamaican Music

Presenter Information

Warren Harding, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A255

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 2:45 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 3:45 PM

Abstract

This project draws upon historical and postcolonial theories to highlight the problem of authenticity” in Jamaican music. I argue that Jamaican musical genres should be historically located in a transnational music dialogue whose definition lay in the transnational experience of the dance hall. In order to do so, this project documents the developments in sound in Jamaican music between 1945 and 1962, and focuses on the varying sound movements in Jamaica, the invention and adoption of the Jamaican sound system, and the major actors in the rise of ska.

Notes

Session II, Panel 9: Determinant Spaces in the Politics of Culture: Reflections from Japan, New York, and Jamaica
Moderator: Gillian Johns, Associate Professor of English

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1370484912

Major

Africana Studies; History

Advisor(s)

Gordon Gill, Africana Studies
Shelley Lee, History

Project Mentor(s)

Meredith Gadsby, Africana Studies

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Apr 26th, 2:45 PM Apr 26th, 3:45 PM

Soundin’ National Cultcha: Creolization, Migration, and Jamaican Music

Science Center, A255

This project draws upon historical and postcolonial theories to highlight the problem of authenticity” in Jamaican music. I argue that Jamaican musical genres should be historically located in a transnational music dialogue whose definition lay in the transnational experience of the dance hall. In order to do so, this project documents the developments in sound in Jamaican music between 1945 and 1962, and focuses on the varying sound movements in Jamaica, the invention and adoption of the Jamaican sound system, and the major actors in the rise of ska.