Event Title

Land Reform and Democratization in Rajasthan State

Presenter Information

Jason Bent, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

At the time of Indian independence in 1947, the region of Rapjputana included roughly two dozen princely states under British suzerainty. After independence, these states were integrated into the greater state of Rajasthan and underwent tremendous economic and political reforms. The first Congress Party-led government of Rajasthan had a limited role in the integration process, and thus emphasized land reform as a core policy priority. The landlord class, known as Jagirdars, fiercely opposed land reform, and the issue ultimately became a driving force in the politics of Rajasthan.

Notes

Session III, Panel 13: The Powers (and Limits) of Persuasion: Case Studies in Liberation, Representation, and Privatization
Moderator: Michael Parkin, Associate Professor of Politics

Major

Economics; History

Advisor(s)

Barbara Craig, Economics
Michael Fisher, History

Project Mentor(s)

Michael Fisher, History

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Apr 26th, 4:00 PM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

Land Reform and Democratization in Rajasthan State

Science Center, A254

At the time of Indian independence in 1947, the region of Rapjputana included roughly two dozen princely states under British suzerainty. After independence, these states were integrated into the greater state of Rajasthan and underwent tremendous economic and political reforms. The first Congress Party-led government of Rajasthan had a limited role in the integration process, and thus emphasized land reform as a core policy priority. The landlord class, known as Jagirdars, fiercely opposed land reform, and the issue ultimately became a driving force in the politics of Rajasthan.