Event Title

Remote Sensing Gypsum in the Chihuahuan Desert

Presenter Information

Arianna Goodman, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, K209

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 2:45 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 3:45 PM

Abstract

Plants that require specialized soils display complex but underexplored genetic patterns related to the distribution of the soils on which they live. A group of plants in the Chihuahuan Desert grow exclusively on island-like patches of gypsum, but the sites of these soils have been poorly mapped and incompletely explored. A comprehensive map of Chihuahuan Desert gypsum could help researchers answer questions about island biogeography in gypsophiles. My research focuses on using satellite imagery to remotely sense these gypsum exposures. I have used maximum entropy analysis and applied spectral indices to create large-scale, medium-resolution maps of gypsum in the region.

Notes

Session II, Panel 10: On the Down Low: Studies of Groundwater and Gypsum
Moderator: Bruce Simonson, Professor of Geology

Major

Biology; Geology

Advisor(s)

Marta Laskowki, Biology
Steve Wojtal, Geology

Project Mentor(s)

Michael Moore, Biology

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Apr 26th, 2:45 PM Apr 26th, 3:45 PM

Remote Sensing Gypsum in the Chihuahuan Desert

Science Center, K209

Plants that require specialized soils display complex but underexplored genetic patterns related to the distribution of the soils on which they live. A group of plants in the Chihuahuan Desert grow exclusively on island-like patches of gypsum, but the sites of these soils have been poorly mapped and incompletely explored. A comprehensive map of Chihuahuan Desert gypsum could help researchers answer questions about island biogeography in gypsophiles. My research focuses on using satellite imagery to remotely sense these gypsum exposures. I have used maximum entropy analysis and applied spectral indices to create large-scale, medium-resolution maps of gypsum in the region.