Event Title

The Content of Thought Experiments and Philosophical Context

Presenter Information

Kevin Gilfether, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, A262

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-26-2013 4:00 PM

End Date

4-26-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

Thought experiments are a common method of trying to make a philosophical point. There is the question, though, about how useful thought experiments are in telling us about the world: what does thinking about killing a king tell us about actually killing a king? Timothy Williamson offers an account of thought experiments based upon a general cognitive capacity to consider counterfactuals. Anna-Sara Malmgren is critical of such a capacity. This work assess both accounts in relation to common philosophical thought experiments and finds Williamson's perspective could be sharpened with an account of philosophical context.

Notes

Session III, Panel 16: The Well-Tempered Self and Others: Case Studies in Philosophy and Psychology
Moderator: Cindy Frantz, Associate Professor of Psychology

Link to full text thesis at OhioLINK ETD Center:
http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=oberlin1368182630

Major

Philosophy

Advisor(s)

Dorit Ganson, Philosophy

Project Mentor(s)

Dorit Ganson, Philosophy

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 26th, 4:00 PM Apr 26th, 5:00 PM

The Content of Thought Experiments and Philosophical Context

Science Center, A262

Thought experiments are a common method of trying to make a philosophical point. There is the question, though, about how useful thought experiments are in telling us about the world: what does thinking about killing a king tell us about actually killing a king? Timothy Williamson offers an account of thought experiments based upon a general cognitive capacity to consider counterfactuals. Anna-Sara Malmgren is critical of such a capacity. This work assess both accounts in relation to common philosophical thought experiments and finds Williamson's perspective could be sharpened with an account of philosophical context.