Event Title

Nonactive Verb Morphology in Classical Nahuatl

Presenter Information

Miriam Rothenberg

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2012 2:45 PM

End Date

4-27-2012 3:45 PM

Abstract

In Classical Nahuatl, nonactive verbs (verbs for which the subject has become the object) take a particular set of endings. Nahuatl distinguishes between passive verbs (nonactive transitive verbs) and impersonal verbs (nonactive intransitive verbs). Within these classes, the nonactive verbs have generally been thought to be fairly regular, with deviations from the expected endings occurring only due to phonological restrictions. This study examines the morphology of these nonactive verbs to see whether irregularities in the nonactive endings could be due in part to morphological differences between the verbs.

Notes

Session II, Panel 3: The Generative Case: Studies of Verb Morphology, Virtual Sonnets, and Twitter Diplomacy
Moderator: Ben Schiff, Professor of Politics

Major

Anthropology; Archaeological Studies

Advisor(s)

Jason Haugen, Anthropology
Susan Kane, Art History

Project Mentor(s)

Jason Haugen, Anthropology

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Apr 27th, 2:45 PM Apr 27th, 3:45 PM

Nonactive Verb Morphology in Classical Nahuatl

Science Center, A254

In Classical Nahuatl, nonactive verbs (verbs for which the subject has become the object) take a particular set of endings. Nahuatl distinguishes between passive verbs (nonactive transitive verbs) and impersonal verbs (nonactive intransitive verbs). Within these classes, the nonactive verbs have generally been thought to be fairly regular, with deviations from the expected endings occurring only due to phonological restrictions. This study examines the morphology of these nonactive verbs to see whether irregularities in the nonactive endings could be due in part to morphological differences between the verbs.