Event Title

The Mozart Effect: Music, Success, and Socioeconomic Status in an American Classroom

Presenter Information

Netta Rappaport

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2012 1:30 PM

End Date

4-27-2012 2:30 PM

Abstract

Though music is considered by many to be important for students’ success, music is often one of the first programs to be cut in public schools during hard economic times. My fieldwork in the eighth-grade band class at Oberlin Middle School examines how students think about music, and suggests that music education can positively affect their academic and social lives. These effects are tempered, however, by the fact that these programs are more accessible to those of higher socioeconomic class.

Notes

Session I, Panel 3: Causes of Despair: Delight, and Ambivalence in American Education
Moderator: Ana Cara, Professor of Hispanic Studies

Major

Anthropology

Advisor(s)

Baron Pineda, Anthropology

Project Mentor(s)

Baron Pineda, Anthropology

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Apr 27th, 1:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

The Mozart Effect: Music, Success, and Socioeconomic Status in an American Classroom

Science Center, A254

Though music is considered by many to be important for students’ success, music is often one of the first programs to be cut in public schools during hard economic times. My fieldwork in the eighth-grade band class at Oberlin Middle School examines how students think about music, and suggests that music education can positively affect their academic and social lives. These effects are tempered, however, by the fact that these programs are more accessible to those of higher socioeconomic class.