Event Title

Symbolism and Language Within The Handmaid’s Tale and its Relevance to Literary Scholarship

Presenter Information

Brittany Brahn

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2012 4:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2012 5:00 PM

Abstract

The face of literary scholarship is changing as the divide between what is considered a “popular novel” and “high literature” continues to narrow. In this project, I consider Margaret Atwood’s popular yet critically acclaimed dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale. With its innovative manipulation of language and symbolism, The Handmaid’s Tale is a prime candidate for serious literary criticism. Because the novel challenges traditional methods of analysis, its study can be looked upon as a model for the future of literary scholarship.

Notes

Session III, Panel 3: Historical Frequencies of Gender, Literature, and Subjectivity
Moderator: Sandra Zagarell, Professor of English

Major

Creative Writing; English

Advisor(s)

Sylvia Watanabe, Creative Writing
William Patrick Day, English

Project Mentor(s)

T.S. McMillin, English

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Apr 27th, 4:00 PM Apr 27th, 5:00 PM

Symbolism and Language Within The Handmaid’s Tale and its Relevance to Literary Scholarship

Science Center, A254

The face of literary scholarship is changing as the divide between what is considered a “popular novel” and “high literature” continues to narrow. In this project, I consider Margaret Atwood’s popular yet critically acclaimed dystopian novel The Handmaid’s Tale. With its innovative manipulation of language and symbolism, The Handmaid’s Tale is a prime candidate for serious literary criticism. Because the novel challenges traditional methods of analysis, its study can be looked upon as a model for the future of literary scholarship.