Event Title

Authorship, Ambiguity, and Authoritarianism in the Fictionalized Prison Writing of Sinan Antoon’s I’jaam and Dulce Chacón’s La Voz Dormida

Presenter Information

Naila Paul

Location

Science Center, A155

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2012 1:30 PM

End Date

4-27-2012 2:30 PM

Abstract

For this project, I compare the novels I’ jaam (2007), by Iraqi author Sinan Antoon, and La Voz Dormida (The Sleeping Voice) (2002) by Spanish author Dulce Chacón. I examine the multiple layers of authorship inscribed in these fictionalized accounts of prison writing set under the repressive authoritarian regimes of Saddam Hussein and Francisco Franco. Responding to issues of deliberate ambiguity, censorship, trauma, and memory, these works reveal varied perspectives on the power of fiction as a means for the expression and transmission of suffering.

Notes

Session I, Panel 2: Hablar el pasado: La ‘negociación’ de las Guerras Civiles en la ficción y la me moria histórica (To Speak the Past: The “Working Through” of Civil Wars in Fiction and Historical Memory—this panel is presented in Spanish)
Moderator: Sebastiaan Faber, Professor of Hispanic Studies

Major

Comparative Literature; Hispanic Studies

Advisor(s)

Sebastiaan Faber, Hispanic Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Sebastiaan Faber, Hispanic Studies

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Apr 27th, 1:30 PM Apr 27th, 2:30 PM

Authorship, Ambiguity, and Authoritarianism in the Fictionalized Prison Writing of Sinan Antoon’s I’jaam and Dulce Chacón’s La Voz Dormida

Science Center, A155

For this project, I compare the novels I’ jaam (2007), by Iraqi author Sinan Antoon, and La Voz Dormida (The Sleeping Voice) (2002) by Spanish author Dulce Chacón. I examine the multiple layers of authorship inscribed in these fictionalized accounts of prison writing set under the repressive authoritarian regimes of Saddam Hussein and Francisco Franco. Responding to issues of deliberate ambiguity, censorship, trauma, and memory, these works reveal varied perspectives on the power of fiction as a means for the expression and transmission of suffering.