Event Title

“Trying to Say”: Memory, Overheard Mothers, and the Rhetoric of Modernity in Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury

Presenter Information

Arielle Kaplan

Location

Science Center, A254

Document Type

Presentation

Start Date

4-27-2012 4:00 PM

End Date

4-27-2012 5:00 PM

Abstract

William Faulkner is hailed as a major figure of American modernist writing, and The Sound and the Fury is considered his most experimental work. Through a careful reading of the maternal figures in a novel narrated entirely by male voices, I explore Faulkner’s attempt to locate the emerging “structure of feeling” of the modern era. His struggle to comprehend characters removed from his own gender and racial position necessitates the creation of a rhetorical method that departs from tradition.

Notes

Session III, Panel 3: Historical Frequencies of Gender, Literature, and Subjectivity
Moderator: Sandra Zagarell, Professor of English

Major

English

Advisor(s)

William Patrick Day, English

Project Mentor(s)

William Patrick Day, English

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Apr 27th, 4:00 PM Apr 27th, 5:00 PM

“Trying to Say”: Memory, Overheard Mothers, and the Rhetoric of Modernity in Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury

Science Center, A254

William Faulkner is hailed as a major figure of American modernist writing, and The Sound and the Fury is considered his most experimental work. Through a careful reading of the maternal figures in a novel narrated entirely by male voices, I explore Faulkner’s attempt to locate the emerging “structure of feeling” of the modern era. His struggle to comprehend characters removed from his own gender and racial position necessitates the creation of a rhetorical method that departs from tradition.