Degree Year

2012

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

Psychology

Advisor(s)

Patricia deWinstanley

Committee Member(s)

Arnie Cox
Al Porterfield

Keywords

Spatial cognition, Music, Conservatory, Music cognition, Change, Interference, Performance, Conservatory of Music, Oberlin College, College students

Abstract

Spatial cognition has been implicated in the perception and production of music within both behavioral and neurological experimental paradigms. Using performance on mental rotation of a three-dimensional object, the present study examined the visuo-spatial abilities of conservatory and non-conservatory students. Participants performed the rotation task under no distraction followed by performance with an interference task, which consisted of detecting either tempo or pitch changes. Conservatory students performed better on the mental rotation task both with and without interference. Musical structure (Western classical versus Indian classical) and musical aspect (tempo changes and pitch changes) influenced how much interference was produced in the mental rotation task. The results confirm the relation between music cognition and spatial cognition with the complexity introduced by the musical structure itself.

Included in

Psychology Commons

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