Degree Year

2015

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Bachelor of Arts

Department

History

Advisor(s)

Clayton Koppes

Committee Member(s)

Renee Romano, Chair
Shelley Lee
David Kelley

Keywords

The Free Speech Movement, Norman Jacobson, Existentialism, Albert Camus, The Myth of Sisyphus, Authenticity, Commitment, Responsibility, 1960s, Radical politics, Mario Savio, Political theory, Clark Kerr, Multiversity, University of California, Berkeley

Abstract

Norman Jacobson, a renowned political theorist at the University of California, Berkeley, experienced firsthand the radical campus politics of the 1960s. Through an analysis of Jacobson's letters, speeches and lectures, this thesis seeks to reconstruct the way Jacobson understood and experienced the 1964 Free Speech Movement. Jacobson attempted to authentically face an overwhelming political crisis at the university. Ultimately, Jacobson knew he must take a stand in response to the student protests. By simply focusing on the concrete political action Jacobson did take, however, one risks overlooking the complexity of his political thought.

Included in

History Commons

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