Event Title

Three Topical Workshop Options

Location

StudiOC

Start Date

6-1-2020 10:45 AM

End Date

6-1-2020 12:00 PM

Description

Brooke Bryan: Supporting and Sustaining Oral History-powered Projects
-This session explores community-based research (CBR) as an empowered and authentic mode of teaching and learning through a review of key pedagogical frameworks that emphasize the import of public scholarship for both communities and students. We will focus on how to build and sustain meaningful community partnerships, showing example digital projects and emphasizing how critical it is that researchers and community leaders enter into this work with a critical understanding of how the digital age complicates informed consent and best practices.

Liz Strong: Oral History and Community-Based Research
-The core ethical practices of oral history provide a strong framework for conducting effective community-based research. This workshop provides a close examination of how to apply these principles by looking at Brooklyn Historical Society’s Muslims in Brooklyn public history project as a case study.

Megan Mitchell: Going Public: Sharing Your Project Online
-This session will focus on three examples of open source web publishing platforms (Omeka, Scalar, and WordPress) used by cultural heritage organizations and educational institutions to present collections and curated exhibitions and to foster community engagement. In addition to looking at examples of projects on each platform, we will discuss key considerations for public-facing digital projects such as project management, metadata, rights and licensing, and sustainability issues.

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Jan 6th, 10:45 AM Jan 6th, 12:00 PM

Three Topical Workshop Options

StudiOC

Brooke Bryan: Supporting and Sustaining Oral History-powered Projects
-This session explores community-based research (CBR) as an empowered and authentic mode of teaching and learning through a review of key pedagogical frameworks that emphasize the import of public scholarship for both communities and students. We will focus on how to build and sustain meaningful community partnerships, showing example digital projects and emphasizing how critical it is that researchers and community leaders enter into this work with a critical understanding of how the digital age complicates informed consent and best practices.

Liz Strong: Oral History and Community-Based Research
-The core ethical practices of oral history provide a strong framework for conducting effective community-based research. This workshop provides a close examination of how to apply these principles by looking at Brooklyn Historical Society’s Muslims in Brooklyn public history project as a case study.

Megan Mitchell: Going Public: Sharing Your Project Online
-This session will focus on three examples of open source web publishing platforms (Omeka, Scalar, and WordPress) used by cultural heritage organizations and educational institutions to present collections and curated exhibitions and to foster community engagement. In addition to looking at examples of projects on each platform, we will discuss key considerations for public-facing digital projects such as project management, metadata, rights and licensing, and sustainability issues.