Title

Realism about Missing Systems

Abstract

Scholars of nationalism have paid little attention to the dilemma of the dominant nation in multinational states. Unlike immigrant societies, multinational states contain one or more territorially concentrated peripheral nations distinct from the dominant nation (e.g., Spain, India). Typically, dominant nations identify with the state as a whole and do not assert their narrower nationalism (e.g., Castilian, Hindu). Building on Linz’s and Stepan’s concept of state-nation, this chapter examines the causes of the emergence of dominant nation nationalism (Serbian, Russian) and its role in different patterns of state dissolution (violent vs peaceful) in the Yugoslav and Soviet cases. While ethnic federalism played a causal role in both cases, the different paths taken by Russian and Serbian particularism must be explained by a combination of factors (institutional; historical legacies encoded in myths and collective memories; ressentiment). A further expansion of the range of comparison beyond democratic state-nations is called for.

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Publication Date

12-20-2019

Department

Philosophy

Document Type

Book Chapter

Notes

Chapter 3.

ISBN

9780190212308

Language

English

Format

text

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