Title

The Other (Commercial) Real Estate Boom and Bust: The Effects of Risk Premia and Regulatory Capital Arbitrage

Abstract

In the 2000 s, U.S. commercial real estate (CRE) prices experienced a boom and bust as dramatic as the more widely analyzed swings in house prices and contributed significantly to bank failures. We model short-run and long-run movements in capitalization rates (rent-to-price-ratio) and risk premia for office building and apartments. In the mid-2000s’ boom, CRE prices were mainly driven by declines in required risk premia that stemmed from a weakening of capital requirements. In the bust, CRE price declines were initially driven by a jump in general risk premia and later by a tightening of effective capital requirements on commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS) from the Dodd-Frank Act. The subsequent recovery in CRE prices was induced and sustained by unusually low real Treasury yields. We conclude that macro-prudential regulation of leverage may help limit asset price booms by preventing sharp declines in risk premia.

Publisher

Elsevier

Publication Date

3-1-2020

Publication Title

Journal of Banking & Finance

Department

Economics

Document Type

Article

DOI

10.1016/j.jbankfin.2018.03.006

Keywords

Asset pricing, Equity premiums, Bank deregulation, Institutional investors, Alternative asset classes, Commercial real estate

Language

English

Format

text

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