Title

The company they keep and avoid: Social goal orientation as a predictor of children’s ethnic segregation

Abstract

This study examined whether social goal orientation (i.e., demonstration–approach, demonstration–avoid, and social development goals) predicts changes in ethnic segregation among 4th and 5th grade African American and European American children (n = 713, ages 9–11 years) from fall to spring. Segregation measures were (a) same-ethnicity favoritism in friendships, (b) same-ethnicity favoritism in peer group affiliations, and (c) cross-ethnicity dislike. Social goal orientation was asymmetrically associated with ethnic segregation for the 2 groups. Among African Americans, aspiring to achieve high social status predicted increases in same-ethnicity favoritism and cross-ethnicity dislike. Among European Americans, aspiring to achieve high social status predicted decreases in same-ethnicity favoritism. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved)

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Publication Date

4-1-2014

Publication Title

Developmental Psychology

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Article

DOI

10.1037/a0035040

Keywords

Middle childhood, Social goal orientation, Cross-ethnic peer relations

Language

English

Format

text

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