Title

The Integration of Americans of Indian Descent

Abstract

When the members of two societies come into contact, changes in the direction of assimilation may occur on four different levels-biological, psychological, cultural, and structural, or, in more descriptive terms, amalgamation, identification, acculturation, and integration may take place. At present, most Indians favor integration but resist forced acculturation. The integration and cultural assimilation of Native Americans have been inhibited by a number of fundamental differences between the majority culture and the cultures of Indian peoples. At the same time, other factors have furthered integration and cultural assimilation. Migration, urbanization, education, economic changes, and intermarriage will facilitate structural integration, a shared identity, and cultural assimilation. In time, full assimilation, or the interaction of all persons without reference to ethnic or racial descent, may come about. For the immediate future, however, pluralism, associated with increasing acculturation and structural integration, seems to be the most likely pattern of relationship between most Indians and non-Indians.

Publisher

SAGE Publications

Publication Date

3-1-1978

Publication Title

Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science

Department

Sociology

Document Type

Article

DOI

10.1177/000271627843600113

Language

English

Format

text

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