Title

African American and European American children in diverse elementary classrooms: Social integration, social status, and social behavior

Abstract

With a sample of African American and European American 3rd- and 4th-grade children (N = 486, ages 8–11 years), this study examined classroom ethnic composition, peer social status (i.e., social preference and perceived popularity as nominated by same- and cross-ethnicity peers), and patterns of ethnic segregation (i.e., friendship, peer group, and cross-ethnicity dislike). African American—but not European American—children had more segregated relationships and were more disliked by cross-ethnicity peers when they had fewer same-ethnicity classmates. African American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity and with cross-ethnicity perceived popularity. European American children’s segregation was positively associated with same-ethnicity social preference but negatively associated with cross-ethnicity social preference and perceived popularity.

Publisher

Wiley

Publication Date

1-1-2011

Publication Title

Child Development

Department

Psychology

Document Type

Article

DOI

10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01634.x

Language

English

Format

text

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