Event Title

Performance of and Amendments to Urban Bioretention Systems for Removal of Stormwater Contaminants

Presenter Information

Emma Eisenbraun, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-27-2017 6:40 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 7:20 PM

Research Program

Re-Inventing the Nation's Urban Water Infrastructure Program (RENUWIT), Colorado School of Mines

Poster Number

40

Abstract

As urbanization has expanded, polluted urban stormwater runoff has become a greater concern. While originally installed to control water quantity by smoothing out urban runoff hydrographs, best management practices such as bioretention systems may also remove contaminants in runoff. This project had three primary goals: 1) to evaluate the performance of the Iris Rain Garden with respect to the removal of dissolved trace organic contaminants, 2) to determine the hydraulic conductivity of various geomedia, and 3) to determine the removal of targeted metal contaminants by various geomedia. It was found that the Iris Rain Garden reduced the amount of atrazine, caffeine, carbendazim, and triphenyl phosphate in stormwater runoff. Furthermore, hydraulic conductivity values for various types of geomedia were determined. Currently, work is being done with various geomedia to characterize the removal of heavy metals.

Major

Chemistry

Project Mentor(s)

Christopher Higgins, Brittnee Halpin, Andrea Portmann and Carrie McDonough, Civil & Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines

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Oct 27th, 6:40 PM Oct 27th, 7:20 PM

Performance of and Amendments to Urban Bioretention Systems for Removal of Stormwater Contaminants

Science Center, Bent Corridor

As urbanization has expanded, polluted urban stormwater runoff has become a greater concern. While originally installed to control water quantity by smoothing out urban runoff hydrographs, best management practices such as bioretention systems may also remove contaminants in runoff. This project had three primary goals: 1) to evaluate the performance of the Iris Rain Garden with respect to the removal of dissolved trace organic contaminants, 2) to determine the hydraulic conductivity of various geomedia, and 3) to determine the removal of targeted metal contaminants by various geomedia. It was found that the Iris Rain Garden reduced the amount of atrazine, caffeine, carbendazim, and triphenyl phosphate in stormwater runoff. Furthermore, hydraulic conductivity values for various types of geomedia were determined. Currently, work is being done with various geomedia to characterize the removal of heavy metals.