Event Title

Stimulating GABAA-α1 Receptors Decreases Sociability

Presenter Information

Sara Chang, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-27-2017 6:00 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 6:40 PM

Poster Number

3

Abstract

The neurological disorders autism and schizophrenia have touched the lives of most people in the United States. These diseases are characterized by dysfunction of the GABA neurotransmitter system and are characterized by changes in social behavior. Previous research from the Paine lab has found that blocking GABAA receptors either systemically or within the prefrontal cortex leads to impairments in social behaviors. , There are a lot of different types of GABAA receptors; the different types of receptors are made of different subunits and have different properties. In the Paine lab this summer, we looked at the effects of stimulating GABAA receptors that contain the α1 subunit, and testing its effects on sociability. Rats were injected with zolpidem, and then placed in social interaction paradigms and tests of reward and locomotor activity. In these paradigms, experimental rats avoided social stimulus at a significantly higher rate than control rats, suggesting impaired sociability.

Major

Neuroscience

Project Mentor(s)

Tracie Paine, Neuroscience

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 27th, 6:00 PM Oct 27th, 6:40 PM

Stimulating GABAA-α1 Receptors Decreases Sociability

Science Center, Bent Corridor

The neurological disorders autism and schizophrenia have touched the lives of most people in the United States. These diseases are characterized by dysfunction of the GABA neurotransmitter system and are characterized by changes in social behavior. Previous research from the Paine lab has found that blocking GABAA receptors either systemically or within the prefrontal cortex leads to impairments in social behaviors. , There are a lot of different types of GABAA receptors; the different types of receptors are made of different subunits and have different properties. In the Paine lab this summer, we looked at the effects of stimulating GABAA receptors that contain the α1 subunit, and testing its effects on sociability. Rats were injected with zolpidem, and then placed in social interaction paradigms and tests of reward and locomotor activity. In these paradigms, experimental rats avoided social stimulus at a significantly higher rate than control rats, suggesting impaired sociability.