Event Title

The Uses of Hydrogen in Metal-Organic Frameworks

Presenter Information

Mark Ligonde, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-27-2017 6:40 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 7:20 PM

Poster Number

8

Abstract

Cars are currently powered using methods that are environmentally threatening. Thus, alternative schemes are being investigated. The purpose of this research is to find ways to power cars using hydrogen fuel cells, and in particular, a method for storing hydrogen within the car. Infrared spectroscopy is an ideal method for studying how molecules stick at a surface. Unfortunately, hydrogen, like oxygen and nitrogen (which are not greenhouse gases, meaning they do not trap the infrared light emitted by the earth) do not interact with infrared light. However, when hydrogen is adsorbed within a material, an induced charge on each end of the molecule lets it be seen by an infrared spectrometer. Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) are materials composed of metal units that form three-dimensional structures with empty spaces to store molecules. They are very good at storing hydrogen but unfortunately, only at extremely low temperatures. It is here that we turn to infrared spectroscopy as a method to analyze the dipole movement. By shining infrared light at hydrogen inside a MOF, we obtain information about the interaction between the hydrogen and the MOF. This information will guide chemists in synthesizing new MOFs with optimized properties for storing hydrogen at room temperature.

Major

Computer Science; Jazz Performance

Award

Science and Technology Research Opportunities for a New Generation (STRONG)

Project Mentor(s)

Stephen FitzGerald, Physics

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Oct 27th, 6:40 PM Oct 27th, 7:20 PM

The Uses of Hydrogen in Metal-Organic Frameworks

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Cars are currently powered using methods that are environmentally threatening. Thus, alternative schemes are being investigated. The purpose of this research is to find ways to power cars using hydrogen fuel cells, and in particular, a method for storing hydrogen within the car. Infrared spectroscopy is an ideal method for studying how molecules stick at a surface. Unfortunately, hydrogen, like oxygen and nitrogen (which are not greenhouse gases, meaning they do not trap the infrared light emitted by the earth) do not interact with infrared light. However, when hydrogen is adsorbed within a material, an induced charge on each end of the molecule lets it be seen by an infrared spectrometer. Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) are materials composed of metal units that form three-dimensional structures with empty spaces to store molecules. They are very good at storing hydrogen but unfortunately, only at extremely low temperatures. It is here that we turn to infrared spectroscopy as a method to analyze the dipole movement. By shining infrared light at hydrogen inside a MOF, we obtain information about the interaction between the hydrogen and the MOF. This information will guide chemists in synthesizing new MOFs with optimized properties for storing hydrogen at room temperature.