Event Title

“It Takes a Village”: How Investment in Self, Community, and Environment Can Influence Low-Income Black Children to Succeed

Presenter Information

Niya Smith-Wilson, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A155

Start Date

10-27-2017 4:30 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 5:50 PM

Abstract

In a society that often focuses on the negative outcomes of Black men and boys due to incarceration and school dropout rates, it is just as essential to focus on why these outcomes exist in the first place and how to prevent them while leaving Black girls and women to be pushed completely to the background. There is a need for additional support, encouragement, and motivation for African American children in order to help them gain social mobility. The purpose of my research is to analyze potential practices such as exposure, discipline, and relationships on behalf of faculty, students, and parents that can encourage Black low income boys and girls leading them to be promoted to the next grade and gaining sense of self. I intend to show how Gary Comer College Prep compared to other public schools have attempted to motivate Black low income boys and girls through the observation of a few practices and policies currently in place. Although the self is the overarching factor that continues to impact one’s path through education and upward mobility, the investment by parents, faculty, local community, and environment can positively influence the value of self and the constant mobility of African American boys and girls from low income neighborhoods. If there is self affirmation accompanied by a stable relationship with one or more of the factors shown to motivate these individuals then they are more likely to achieve academic success and social mobility.

Notes

Session II, Panel 7 - Educational | Access
Moderator: Khalid Taylor, Student Life Program Coordinator in the Multicultural Resource Center

Major

Psychology; Africana Studies

Award

Oberlin College Research Fellowship (OCRF)

Project Mentor(s)

Clovis White, Sociology

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Oct 27th, 4:30 PM Oct 27th, 5:50 PM

“It Takes a Village”: How Investment in Self, Community, and Environment Can Influence Low-Income Black Children to Succeed

Science Center A155

In a society that often focuses on the negative outcomes of Black men and boys due to incarceration and school dropout rates, it is just as essential to focus on why these outcomes exist in the first place and how to prevent them while leaving Black girls and women to be pushed completely to the background. There is a need for additional support, encouragement, and motivation for African American children in order to help them gain social mobility. The purpose of my research is to analyze potential practices such as exposure, discipline, and relationships on behalf of faculty, students, and parents that can encourage Black low income boys and girls leading them to be promoted to the next grade and gaining sense of self. I intend to show how Gary Comer College Prep compared to other public schools have attempted to motivate Black low income boys and girls through the observation of a few practices and policies currently in place. Although the self is the overarching factor that continues to impact one’s path through education and upward mobility, the investment by parents, faculty, local community, and environment can positively influence the value of self and the constant mobility of African American boys and girls from low income neighborhoods. If there is self affirmation accompanied by a stable relationship with one or more of the factors shown to motivate these individuals then they are more likely to achieve academic success and social mobility.