Event Title

Pulsar Searching at NAOC and FAST Site, China

Presenter Information

Shana Li, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A247

Start Date

10-27-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 4:20 PM

Research Program

NSF, NANOGrav, and National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC)

Abstract

For 10 weeks during the summer of 2017, I, along with an undergraduate student co-worker, undertook pulsar searching research at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guizhou Normal University (GZNU), and the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST). Pulsars, which are strongly magnetized neutron stars, are remnants of main sequence stars that exhaust their fuel and explode in supernovae that emit periodic electromagnetic radiation that can be detected by radio telescopes. We worked with several researchers at NAOC to develop computer scripts that run a pulsar searching program named PRESTO (no relation to the Oberlin administrative software!). After vigorously developing, testing, and debugging our code by searching for existing pulsars in Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data, we ultimately processed recent data from the Arecibo radio telescope using our scripts, in which we found the known pulsar J0509+08 among other plausible new signals. Our work gives us ample opportunity to further astronomical exploration in gravitational wave detection, the interstellar medium, and other galactic properties. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through a grant to the NANOGrav collaboration, of which Professor Dan Stinebring of Oberlin is a member.

Notes

Session I, Panel 3 - Physical | Science
Moderator: Jason Stalnaker, Associate Professor of Physics

Major

Physics

Project Mentor(s)

Dan Stinebring, Physics; Di Li, NAOC
Maura McLaughlin, West Virginia University

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Oct 27th, 3:00 PM Oct 27th, 4:20 PM

Pulsar Searching at NAOC and FAST Site, China

Science Center A247

For 10 weeks during the summer of 2017, I, along with an undergraduate student co-worker, undertook pulsar searching research at the National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guizhou Normal University (GZNU), and the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST). Pulsars, which are strongly magnetized neutron stars, are remnants of main sequence stars that exhaust their fuel and explode in supernovae that emit periodic electromagnetic radiation that can be detected by radio telescopes. We worked with several researchers at NAOC to develop computer scripts that run a pulsar searching program named PRESTO (no relation to the Oberlin administrative software!). After vigorously developing, testing, and debugging our code by searching for existing pulsars in Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey data, we ultimately processed recent data from the Arecibo radio telescope using our scripts, in which we found the known pulsar J0509+08 among other plausible new signals. Our work gives us ample opportunity to further astronomical exploration in gravitational wave detection, the interstellar medium, and other galactic properties. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation through a grant to the NANOGrav collaboration, of which Professor Dan Stinebring of Oberlin is a member.