Event Title

Hydrogen Isotopic Gas Separation in Metal Organic Frameworks

Location

Science Center A247

Start Date

10-27-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 4:20 PM

Poster Number

59

Abstract

Deuterium is a rare isotope of hydrogen that has applications in NMR, nuclear power, and as a medical tracer. Due to its value and scarcity, there is significant interest in developing new methods to more effectively and cheaply separate deuterium (D2) from common hydrogen (H2). We are investigating a separation method using a class of materials called Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs). These MOFs act like sponges, adsorbing both isotopes into distinct sites at very low temperature. When heated, the isotopes escape from these sites at slightly different temperatures due to the difference in their quantum zero-point energy. How can we make this separation better? Is there a smarter way? What quantum shenanigans are left to exploit? Our talk will answer these questions and more.

Notes

Session I, Panel 3 - Physical | Science
Moderator: Jason Stalnaker, Associate Professor of Physics

Major

Katie Rigdon, Physics; Dance
Isaac Hietanen, Physics; Politics

Project Mentor(s)

Stephen FitzGerald, Physics

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Oct 27th, 3:00 PM Oct 27th, 4:20 PM

Hydrogen Isotopic Gas Separation in Metal Organic Frameworks

Science Center A247

Deuterium is a rare isotope of hydrogen that has applications in NMR, nuclear power, and as a medical tracer. Due to its value and scarcity, there is significant interest in developing new methods to more effectively and cheaply separate deuterium (D2) from common hydrogen (H2). We are investigating a separation method using a class of materials called Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs). These MOFs act like sponges, adsorbing both isotopes into distinct sites at very low temperature. When heated, the isotopes escape from these sites at slightly different temperatures due to the difference in their quantum zero-point energy. How can we make this separation better? Is there a smarter way? What quantum shenanigans are left to exploit? Our talk will answer these questions and more.