Event Title

Raising Babies, Raising Communities: Environment and Infant Mortality Disparities in Cleveland

Presenter Information

Nia Daids, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A155

Start Date

10-27-2017 3:00 PM

End Date

10-27-2017 4:20 PM

Abstract

The purpose of this research project is to investigate the relationship between urban environmental and social disadvantage, related health impacts, and community-building using infant mortality disparities in Cleveland, OH as a case study. Infant mortality is defined as the death of babies before their first birthday. The infant mortality rate (IMR) is the number of such deaths out of every 1,000 live births. Cleveland has one of the worst infant mortality disparities: three black babies die for every one white baby. Research on the causes of these disparities has concluded that the high IMR of black babies is consistent with a higher rate of two of the major causes of infant mortality: premature birth and sleeping conditions. Government agencies, medical establishments, and non-profits have made efforts to decrease these numbers with some success. Research has also shown that many Black families feel that they need support and freedom from stigma. My research seeks to understand the social and environmental barriers that Black families confront, document the existing initiatives to address the barriers, and explore the ways in which initiatives might give Black families the support they need. This project utilizes literature review, interviews of organizations, and health report analysis. I hypothesize that safer public spaces, better transportation options, improved food access and healthcare facilities, and affirming existing community ties are equally important and should be included in Cleveland efforts to reduce infant mortality.

Notes

Session I, Panel 2 - Health | Disparities
Moderator: Nicollette Mitchell, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Inclusive Excellence STEM Fellow

Major

Environmental Studies

Award

Oberlin College Research Fellowship (OCRF)

Project Mentor(s)

Rumi Shammin, Environmental Studies

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 27th, 3:00 PM Oct 27th, 4:20 PM

Raising Babies, Raising Communities: Environment and Infant Mortality Disparities in Cleveland

Science Center A155

The purpose of this research project is to investigate the relationship between urban environmental and social disadvantage, related health impacts, and community-building using infant mortality disparities in Cleveland, OH as a case study. Infant mortality is defined as the death of babies before their first birthday. The infant mortality rate (IMR) is the number of such deaths out of every 1,000 live births. Cleveland has one of the worst infant mortality disparities: three black babies die for every one white baby. Research on the causes of these disparities has concluded that the high IMR of black babies is consistent with a higher rate of two of the major causes of infant mortality: premature birth and sleeping conditions. Government agencies, medical establishments, and non-profits have made efforts to decrease these numbers with some success. Research has also shown that many Black families feel that they need support and freedom from stigma. My research seeks to understand the social and environmental barriers that Black families confront, document the existing initiatives to address the barriers, and explore the ways in which initiatives might give Black families the support they need. This project utilizes literature review, interviews of organizations, and health report analysis. I hypothesize that safer public spaces, better transportation options, improved food access and healthcare facilities, and affirming existing community ties are equally important and should be included in Cleveland efforts to reduce infant mortality.