Event Title

Atomic Spectroscopy of Lithium Using an Optical Frequency Comb

Presenter Information

Claire Segura, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:00 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

Poster Number

32

Abstract

This experiment is concerned with investigating the atomic structure of lithium using laser spectroscopy. These results will serve as a test of atomic theory and provide a window into the nuclear structure of lithium. Laser spectroscopy investigates atomic structure by exciting atoms using lasers with well-defined frequencies. In many cases, the precision with which the energies can be measured is limited by the precision to which the frequency of the laser can be determined. By referencing a laser to an optical frequency comb, the frequency can be determined with an accuracy of 1 part in 1012, making optical frequency measurements some of the most precise measurements in science. The setup is nearing full development, and successful measurements are currently underway. We are now addressing systematic effects related to alignment of the laser and the atomic beam.

Major

Physics; Studio Art

Award

Science and Technology Research Opportunities for a New Generation (STRONG)

Project Mentor(s)

Jason Stalnaker, Physics

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Oct 28th, 5:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:30 PM

Atomic Spectroscopy of Lithium Using an Optical Frequency Comb

Science Center, Bent Corridor

This experiment is concerned with investigating the atomic structure of lithium using laser spectroscopy. These results will serve as a test of atomic theory and provide a window into the nuclear structure of lithium. Laser spectroscopy investigates atomic structure by exciting atoms using lasers with well-defined frequencies. In many cases, the precision with which the energies can be measured is limited by the precision to which the frequency of the laser can be determined. By referencing a laser to an optical frequency comb, the frequency can be determined with an accuracy of 1 part in 1012, making optical frequency measurements some of the most precise measurements in science. The setup is nearing full development, and successful measurements are currently underway. We are now addressing systematic effects related to alignment of the laser and the atomic beam.