Event Title

Dorsal Dauers and Directionally Dysfunctional dex-1 Dumpies

Presenter Information

Caroline Beshers, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:00 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

Research Program

Schroeder Laboratory, Department of Crop Sciences, College of ACES, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Poster Number

54

Abstract

The dauer life stage in wild-type C. elegans exhibits morphological and behavioral characteristics that differentiate it from non-dauers. In addition to the commonly observed radial shrinkage, quiescence and lack of pharyngeal pumping, we noted a tendency of wild-type dauers to lie dorsoventrally when mounted on agarose slides, as opposed to laterally like adults. To quantify this observation, we mounted wild-type dauers and L3s on increasing concentrations of agarose with 0.1 M levamisole. We found that 75-90% of wild-type dauers mounted with levamisole lie dorsoventrally regardless of agarose concentration. Very few (2.5-5%) non-dauer animals were positioned dorsoventrally. There was no significant difference in positioning between dauers that still retained their L2d cuticle and those that were completely molted. We then utilized a non-anesthetic method of immobilization by mounting dauers on 10% agarose with 10 micron polystyrene microbeads. Interestingly, only 15% of wild type dauers lie dorsoventrally when mounted using microbeads. We hypothesized that the radial shrinkage and the presence of lateral alae in wild-type dauer cuticles may cause anesthetized dauers to roll to a dorsoventral position, but that “conscious” dauers immobilized with microbeads would remain lateral, despite the presence of alae. To test this, we examined dex-1 mutant dauers. We recently found that dex-1(ns42) dauers are defective for dauer alae formation and radial constriction leading to a “dumpy” dauer phenotype. We found that dex-1 dauers are significantly more likely to lay laterally than wild-type dauers (p=0.0013) suggesting that dauer alae or overall body dimensions regulate the anesthetized “sleeping” position.

Major

Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Nathan Schroeder, Schroeder Laboratory, Department of Crop Sciences, College of ACES, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

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Oct 28th, 5:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:30 PM

Dorsal Dauers and Directionally Dysfunctional dex-1 Dumpies

Science Center, Bent Corridor

The dauer life stage in wild-type C. elegans exhibits morphological and behavioral characteristics that differentiate it from non-dauers. In addition to the commonly observed radial shrinkage, quiescence and lack of pharyngeal pumping, we noted a tendency of wild-type dauers to lie dorsoventrally when mounted on agarose slides, as opposed to laterally like adults. To quantify this observation, we mounted wild-type dauers and L3s on increasing concentrations of agarose with 0.1 M levamisole. We found that 75-90% of wild-type dauers mounted with levamisole lie dorsoventrally regardless of agarose concentration. Very few (2.5-5%) non-dauer animals were positioned dorsoventrally. There was no significant difference in positioning between dauers that still retained their L2d cuticle and those that were completely molted. We then utilized a non-anesthetic method of immobilization by mounting dauers on 10% agarose with 10 micron polystyrene microbeads. Interestingly, only 15% of wild type dauers lie dorsoventrally when mounted using microbeads. We hypothesized that the radial shrinkage and the presence of lateral alae in wild-type dauer cuticles may cause anesthetized dauers to roll to a dorsoventral position, but that “conscious” dauers immobilized with microbeads would remain lateral, despite the presence of alae. To test this, we examined dex-1 mutant dauers. We recently found that dex-1(ns42) dauers are defective for dauer alae formation and radial constriction leading to a “dumpy” dauer phenotype. We found that dex-1 dauers are significantly more likely to lay laterally than wild-type dauers (p=0.0013) suggesting that dauer alae or overall body dimensions regulate the anesthetized “sleeping” position.