Event Title

Comparing Gender and Ethnicity as Factors of Homophily during Middle Childhood

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 6:00 PM

Poster Number

29

Abstract

Homophily, the tendency for individuals to create bonds with people who are similar to them, is pervasive in childhood and adolescence. The purpose of this research was to examine age differences in gender and racial homophily among African Americans and European Americans during middle childhood. 603 participants in grade 1 (age 6-7), grade 3 (age 8-9), and grade 5 (age 10-11) were surveyed in their respective classrooms during the fall, winter, and spring of an academic year. The present analysis concerns participant responses to two survey items: “Who are your FRIENDS?” and “Who do you LIKE LEAST to play with?” Two indices of positive in-group bias (PIB-gender, PIB-ethnicity) were derived from the FRIENDS measure, and two indices of negative out-group bias (NOB-gender, NOB-ethnicity) were derived from the LIKE LEAST measure. In both the PIB and NOB, gender was a stronger factor than ethnicity. PIB-gender was significantly less in grade 1 than in grades 3 and 5, but did not differ between grades 3 and 5. NOB-gender and NOB-Ethnicity differed significantly between grades 1, 3, and 5. The variation in both PIB and NOB is consistent for each grade. The results of this study not only adds to lacking information about middle childhood but may also be used to inform school interventions designed to combat oppression.

Major

Psychology; Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Travis Wilson, Psychology

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Oct 28th, 5:30 PM Oct 28th, 6:00 PM

Comparing Gender and Ethnicity as Factors of Homophily during Middle Childhood

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Homophily, the tendency for individuals to create bonds with people who are similar to them, is pervasive in childhood and adolescence. The purpose of this research was to examine age differences in gender and racial homophily among African Americans and European Americans during middle childhood. 603 participants in grade 1 (age 6-7), grade 3 (age 8-9), and grade 5 (age 10-11) were surveyed in their respective classrooms during the fall, winter, and spring of an academic year. The present analysis concerns participant responses to two survey items: “Who are your FRIENDS?” and “Who do you LIKE LEAST to play with?” Two indices of positive in-group bias (PIB-gender, PIB-ethnicity) were derived from the FRIENDS measure, and two indices of negative out-group bias (NOB-gender, NOB-ethnicity) were derived from the LIKE LEAST measure. In both the PIB and NOB, gender was a stronger factor than ethnicity. PIB-gender was significantly less in grade 1 than in grades 3 and 5, but did not differ between grades 3 and 5. NOB-gender and NOB-Ethnicity differed significantly between grades 1, 3, and 5. The variation in both PIB and NOB is consistent for each grade. The results of this study not only adds to lacking information about middle childhood but may also be used to inform school interventions designed to combat oppression.