Event Title

A New Test of Visual and Verbal Thinking

Presenter Information

Noel Warford, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 6:00 PM

Research Program

Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence and Visual Analogical Systems, Vanderbilt University School of Engineering

Poster Number

55

Abstract

This research investigates whether people show differences in recruiting visual or verbal mental representations when solving problems, and whether people’s subjective perceptions of their own representational biases reflect reality. We adapted four tasks from the literature that 1) can be solved equally well with either visual or verbal mental representations, and 2) contain some behavioral marker that indicates which type of representation is being used, independent of task performance levels. The four tasks are (1) a verification of the relationship between sentences and pictures, both of which encode spatial information, (2) an arithmetic task-switching task with visual and aural suppression, (3) a serial recall task in which the participant recalls sequences of digits with visual and aural suppression and (4) another serial recall task in which the participant must recall sequences of pictures that have visual or verbal similarities. We also gave participants two subjective, introspective questionnaires about mental representational style: the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (VVIQ) and the Visualizer-Verbalizer Questionnaire (VVQ). Analysis of results is ongoing.

Major

Computer Science; Organ Performance

Project Mentor(s)

Maithilee Kunda, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University School of Engineering

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Oct 28th, 5:30 PM Oct 28th, 6:00 PM

A New Test of Visual and Verbal Thinking

Science Center, Bent Corridor

This research investigates whether people show differences in recruiting visual or verbal mental representations when solving problems, and whether people’s subjective perceptions of their own representational biases reflect reality. We adapted four tasks from the literature that 1) can be solved equally well with either visual or verbal mental representations, and 2) contain some behavioral marker that indicates which type of representation is being used, independent of task performance levels. The four tasks are (1) a verification of the relationship between sentences and pictures, both of which encode spatial information, (2) an arithmetic task-switching task with visual and aural suppression, (3) a serial recall task in which the participant recalls sequences of digits with visual and aural suppression and (4) another serial recall task in which the participant must recall sequences of pictures that have visual or verbal similarities. We also gave participants two subjective, introspective questionnaires about mental representational style: the Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (VVIQ) and the Visualizer-Verbalizer Questionnaire (VVQ). Analysis of results is ongoing.