Event Title

TTF-1 Expression in Gliomas: An Evaluation of 275 Cases and its Clinical Significance

Presenter Information

Nina Afsar, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 6:00 PM

Research Program

Summer Internship Program, National Cancer Institute (NCI), National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Poster Number

49

Abstract

Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor responsible for lung and thyroid organogenesis. With immunohistochemical analysis, TTF-1 is pathologically relevant in its role as a specific marker for tumors of pulmonary and thyroid origin; however, aberrant nuclear expression of TTF-1 in gliomas has occasionally been reported. The implications of this expression have yet to be determined in routine practice, and it is unknown if there is diagnostic and prognostic utility in the frequency/pattern of expression of TTF-1 in gliomas. To investigate the prevalence of TTF-1 positivity in gliomas, we sought to characterize its frequency and pattern of expression in 275 diffuse gliomas. Of the 275 glioma cases included in this study, 32 (11.6%) demonstrated unequivocal immunoreactivity with the TTF-1 SP141 clone, and 1 (0.36%) with the 8G7G3/1 clone. The implications of this expression in glioma biology and behavior are still unclear, but pathologists should be aware of the potential diagnostic pitfalls when using the TTF-1 stain.

Major

Neuroscience

Project Mentor(s)

Drew Pratt and Martha Quezado, Lab of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health

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Oct 28th, 5:30 PM Oct 28th, 6:00 PM

TTF-1 Expression in Gliomas: An Evaluation of 275 Cases and its Clinical Significance

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) is a homeodomain-containing transcription factor responsible for lung and thyroid organogenesis. With immunohistochemical analysis, TTF-1 is pathologically relevant in its role as a specific marker for tumors of pulmonary and thyroid origin; however, aberrant nuclear expression of TTF-1 in gliomas has occasionally been reported. The implications of this expression have yet to be determined in routine practice, and it is unknown if there is diagnostic and prognostic utility in the frequency/pattern of expression of TTF-1 in gliomas. To investigate the prevalence of TTF-1 positivity in gliomas, we sought to characterize its frequency and pattern of expression in 275 diffuse gliomas. Of the 275 glioma cases included in this study, 32 (11.6%) demonstrated unequivocal immunoreactivity with the TTF-1 SP141 clone, and 1 (0.36%) with the 8G7G3/1 clone. The implications of this expression in glioma biology and behavior are still unclear, but pathologists should be aware of the potential diagnostic pitfalls when using the TTF-1 stain.