Event Title

Multifarious Applications of Muon Tomography

Presenter Information

Mohit Dubey, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 6:00 PM

Research Program

Los Alamos National Laboratory, Particle Physics Division

Poster Number

3

Abstract

Muon Scattering Radiography, a technique developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is being used to solve problems ranging from international nuclear security to investigation of architectural integrity. Using detectors consisting of orthogonal layers of drift tubes, we are able to track the paths of naturally occurring muons passing through thick objects and, in turn, create images of these objects and enclosed materials. We are currently applying this technique to three major problems across the globe: detection of support structures within the Santa Maria del Fiore duomo in Florence, differentiation of fresh and spent nuclear fuel casks at Idaho National Laboratory, and imaging of the failed reactors and contained nuclear waste in Fukushima. In each of these cases, muon tomography provides a unique benefit to solving the problem compared to other technique thanks to the abundance of naturally occurring cosmic rays muons, the simplicity of the detectors, and the relatively short time scales required to produce a useful image. We also hope to apply the technique to more far-reaching areas in the coming years with applications in geology (imaging underground cavities) and civil engineering (investigating oxidized piping).

Major

Physics; Classical Guitar

Project Mentor(s)

Elena Guardincerri, Los Alamos National Laboratory

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Oct 28th, 5:30 PM Oct 28th, 6:00 PM

Multifarious Applications of Muon Tomography

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Muon Scattering Radiography, a technique developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, is being used to solve problems ranging from international nuclear security to investigation of architectural integrity. Using detectors consisting of orthogonal layers of drift tubes, we are able to track the paths of naturally occurring muons passing through thick objects and, in turn, create images of these objects and enclosed materials. We are currently applying this technique to three major problems across the globe: detection of support structures within the Santa Maria del Fiore duomo in Florence, differentiation of fresh and spent nuclear fuel casks at Idaho National Laboratory, and imaging of the failed reactors and contained nuclear waste in Fukushima. In each of these cases, muon tomography provides a unique benefit to solving the problem compared to other technique thanks to the abundance of naturally occurring cosmic rays muons, the simplicity of the detectors, and the relatively short time scales required to produce a useful image. We also hope to apply the technique to more far-reaching areas in the coming years with applications in geology (imaging underground cavities) and civil engineering (investigating oxidized piping).