Event Title

Engineering Self-Powering Water Treatment Systems: Understanding Patterns of MethaneProduction and Producers in Anaerobic Waste Water Treatment

Presenter Information

Jennifer Feigin, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:00 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

Research Program

Engineering Research Center for Re-inventing the Nation's Urban Water Infrastructure (ReNUWIt) REU, Colorado School of Mines; Stanford University; The National Science Foundation

Poster Number

4

Abstract

Current large-scale aerobic waste water treatment methods often produce large amounts of activated sludge waste and have high operational costs due to pumping and aeration. Anaerobic treatment, by contrast, produces less sludge waste, requires less energy, and has the potential for biogas recovery in the form of methane. Treatment of waste water with anaerobic baffled reactors (ABRs) has been studied and shows promise for full-scale, energy-neutral wastewater treatment. This study aims to assess methane production and to identify microbial communities and quantify methanogenic DNA in ABRs over time in order to evaluate the future potential for self-powering anaerobic systems using methane. The impacts of system disturbances, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), and temperature were also examined at different stages in the ABR treatment processes. The overall upward trend of both methanogen communities, methane production and system stabilization from beginning to end of treatment and over time indicated a strong potential for future biogas recovery and reuse applications.

Major

History; Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Junko Munakata Marr, Lynne Albert, Major Andy Pfluger, Pamela McLeod, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Colorado School of Mines

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Oct 28th, 5:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:30 PM

Engineering Self-Powering Water Treatment Systems: Understanding Patterns of MethaneProduction and Producers in Anaerobic Waste Water Treatment

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Current large-scale aerobic waste water treatment methods often produce large amounts of activated sludge waste and have high operational costs due to pumping and aeration. Anaerobic treatment, by contrast, produces less sludge waste, requires less energy, and has the potential for biogas recovery in the form of methane. Treatment of waste water with anaerobic baffled reactors (ABRs) has been studied and shows promise for full-scale, energy-neutral wastewater treatment. This study aims to assess methane production and to identify microbial communities and quantify methanogenic DNA in ABRs over time in order to evaluate the future potential for self-powering anaerobic systems using methane. The impacts of system disturbances, Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), and temperature were also examined at different stages in the ABR treatment processes. The overall upward trend of both methanogen communities, methane production and system stabilization from beginning to end of treatment and over time indicated a strong potential for future biogas recovery and reuse applications.