Event Title

Hydrogen Gas-M.O.F. Interactions at Low Temperatures

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:00 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

Poster Number

30

Abstract

Today’s fuel market is trying to create a way to provide fuel for cars without producing greenhouse-gas emissions. One approach is with hydrogen cells. Hydrogen cells use hydrogen and oxygen gas from water to react and produce chemical energy and water, in turn creating a closed, self-sufficient energy loop, one that begins and ends with environmentally safe materials. Unfortunately, in order for a sufficient amount of hydrogen to be stored in a hydrogen fuel cell, the hydrogen must stay at low temperatures, making hydrogen storage impractical. To address this problem, our lab studied metal-organic frameworks (MOF’s)—energy conduits/catalysts that could possibly provide realistic means of hydrogen storage. MOF’s serve as “sponges” that soak in great amounts of hydrogen gas, negating the need for vast amounts of hydrogen storage in tight spaces such as cars. Our lab was specifically interested in the behavior of hydrogen gas when in contact with MOF’s at low temperatures. To explore the behavior of MOF’s, our lab measured and explored the sites at which the hydrogen gas was best trapped with infrared spectroscopy, and measured how well and at what energy level/temperature the hydrogen was adsorbing to and desorbing from the MOF with TPD’s (temperature-programmed desorption). By measuring these key characteristics of hydrogen-MOF interactions, our lab may offer insight into the possible storage options of sufficient hydrogen gas in cars.

Award

Science and Technology Research Opportunities for a New Generation (STRONG)

Project Mentor(s)

Stephen Fitzgerald

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Oct 28th, 5:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:30 PM

Hydrogen Gas-M.O.F. Interactions at Low Temperatures

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Today’s fuel market is trying to create a way to provide fuel for cars without producing greenhouse-gas emissions. One approach is with hydrogen cells. Hydrogen cells use hydrogen and oxygen gas from water to react and produce chemical energy and water, in turn creating a closed, self-sufficient energy loop, one that begins and ends with environmentally safe materials. Unfortunately, in order for a sufficient amount of hydrogen to be stored in a hydrogen fuel cell, the hydrogen must stay at low temperatures, making hydrogen storage impractical. To address this problem, our lab studied metal-organic frameworks (MOF’s)—energy conduits/catalysts that could possibly provide realistic means of hydrogen storage. MOF’s serve as “sponges” that soak in great amounts of hydrogen gas, negating the need for vast amounts of hydrogen storage in tight spaces such as cars. Our lab was specifically interested in the behavior of hydrogen gas when in contact with MOF’s at low temperatures. To explore the behavior of MOF’s, our lab measured and explored the sites at which the hydrogen gas was best trapped with infrared spectroscopy, and measured how well and at what energy level/temperature the hydrogen was adsorbing to and desorbing from the MOF with TPD’s (temperature-programmed desorption). By measuring these key characteristics of hydrogen-MOF interactions, our lab may offer insight into the possible storage options of sufficient hydrogen gas in cars.