Event Title

Impact of Stress Responsive Transcription Factors on the Composition on E. coli Biofilms

Presenter Information

Emma Brezel, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-28-2016 5:00 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 5:30 PM

Poster Number

20

Abstract

The bacterial stress response is governed by stress-specific transcription factors that change the gene expression and protein activity of the bacteria in order to survive a variety of suboptimal conditions. The rpoF gene in E. coli encodes one of these transcription factors, sigma factor 28 (σ28). RpoF (sigma factor 28, fliA) is necessary for flagellar synthesis and chemotaxis. RpoH (sigma factor 32) is another important transcription factor that governs the heat shock response. We are interested in over expressing these transcription factors in E. coli and exploring the effects on biofilm composition in order to better understand the relationship between bacterial stress response pathways and the natural process of biofilm formation. Specifically, we are extracting the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which forms the functional and structural integrity of the biofilm, in order to analyze the concentration of proteins and carbohydrates. By determining how EPS composition changes depending on the presence of particular stress responsive transcription factors, we can potentially develop more effective pathway specific strategies for inhibiting biofilm formation. By disrupting biofilm formation, bacteria in their planktonic state will be more vulnerable to antibiotics or immune responses.

Major

Biochemistry

Project Mentor(s)

Lisa Ryno, Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Oct 28th, 5:00 PM Oct 28th, 5:30 PM

Impact of Stress Responsive Transcription Factors on the Composition on E. coli Biofilms

Science Center, Bent Corridor

The bacterial stress response is governed by stress-specific transcription factors that change the gene expression and protein activity of the bacteria in order to survive a variety of suboptimal conditions. The rpoF gene in E. coli encodes one of these transcription factors, sigma factor 28 (σ28). RpoF (sigma factor 28, fliA) is necessary for flagellar synthesis and chemotaxis. RpoH (sigma factor 32) is another important transcription factor that governs the heat shock response. We are interested in over expressing these transcription factors in E. coli and exploring the effects on biofilm composition in order to better understand the relationship between bacterial stress response pathways and the natural process of biofilm formation. Specifically, we are extracting the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS), which forms the functional and structural integrity of the biofilm, in order to analyze the concentration of proteins and carbohydrates. By determining how EPS composition changes depending on the presence of particular stress responsive transcription factors, we can potentially develop more effective pathway specific strategies for inhibiting biofilm formation. By disrupting biofilm formation, bacteria in their planktonic state will be more vulnerable to antibiotics or immune responses.