Event Title

Water Cycle Music: Sonifying Hubbard Brook Data

Presenter Information

Torrin J. Hallett, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A247

Start Date

10-28-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 4:50 PM

Research Program

Hubbard Brook Research Foundation and National Science Foundation

Abstract

During 2015, high frequency water cycle data were collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, a National Science Foundation Long Term Ecological Research Site and USDA Forest Service Experimental Forest in Woodstock, New Hampshire. In the summer of 2016, Hubbard Brook scientists collaborated with Torrin J. Hallett, a composer studying at Oberlin College and Conservatory, to create a musical representation of these data using the visual programming language Max/MSP. Torrin used the data values to control different sounds' pitches, volumes, and frequencies of re-articulation. The end result is a fourteen -minute -long, computer generated musical piece that represents the data. This piece and can be played either by itself or alongside visual graphs, enabling members of both the scientific and non-scientific communities to better interact with the data and draw conclusions from them.

Notes

Session II, Panel 6 - Culture & Place

Major

Horn Performance; Music Composition; Mathematics

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Oct 28th, 3:30 PM Oct 28th, 4:50 PM

Water Cycle Music: Sonifying Hubbard Brook Data

Science Center A247

During 2015, high frequency water cycle data were collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, a National Science Foundation Long Term Ecological Research Site and USDA Forest Service Experimental Forest in Woodstock, New Hampshire. In the summer of 2016, Hubbard Brook scientists collaborated with Torrin J. Hallett, a composer studying at Oberlin College and Conservatory, to create a musical representation of these data using the visual programming language Max/MSP. Torrin used the data values to control different sounds' pitches, volumes, and frequencies of re-articulation. The end result is a fourteen -minute -long, computer generated musical piece that represents the data. This piece and can be played either by itself or alongside visual graphs, enabling members of both the scientific and non-scientific communities to better interact with the data and draw conclusions from them.