Event Title

Youth Peer Group Bias

Presenter Information

Tyler Parlor, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A155

Start Date

10-28-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 4:50 PM

Abstract

The purpose of my research is to examine youth peer group dynamics and the relationship between ethnicity and gender by analyzing child participants from elementary schools in four urban settings. This is done in an attempt to discover a cure for cross ethnic tension and an ease of its intensity. My methods for this include analyzing data collected on first, third, and fifth grade students’ friendship patterns and an intensive review of children’s cross-ethnic friendship literature. In this study ethnic groups were limited to Black and White children only. The data was gathered utilizing self-report surveys. This research is very important because building a more equitable society simply requires improved understanding and communication between people of diverse backgrounds and identities; the patterns that children develop in elementary schools are essential building blocks to adult behavior. Ethnicity is a significant factor in youth peer group dynamics, evident as early as grade one.

Notes

Session II, Panel 5 - Blackness & Bias

Major

Psychology; Pre-Med

Award

Oberlin College Research Fellowship (OCRF)

Project Mentor(s)

Travis Wilson, Psychology

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Oct 28th, 3:30 PM Oct 28th, 4:50 PM

Youth Peer Group Bias

Science Center A155

The purpose of my research is to examine youth peer group dynamics and the relationship between ethnicity and gender by analyzing child participants from elementary schools in four urban settings. This is done in an attempt to discover a cure for cross ethnic tension and an ease of its intensity. My methods for this include analyzing data collected on first, third, and fifth grade students’ friendship patterns and an intensive review of children’s cross-ethnic friendship literature. In this study ethnic groups were limited to Black and White children only. The data was gathered utilizing self-report surveys. This research is very important because building a more equitable society simply requires improved understanding and communication between people of diverse backgrounds and identities; the patterns that children develop in elementary schools are essential building blocks to adult behavior. Ethnicity is a significant factor in youth peer group dynamics, evident as early as grade one.