Event Title

Public Education in the New South Africa: A Case Study on the Ehlanzeni School District

Presenter Information

Thobeka Mnisi, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A154

Start Date

10-28-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

10-28-2016 4:50 PM

Abstract

Following the end of forty years of apartheid, South Africa's constitution sought to redress the injustices of Apartheid by promoting human rights and equality. Accordingly, the constitution committed the state to recognize the injustices of the past, improve the quality of life for all, and establish the foundations for a democratic South Africa. Some twenty years later, certain districts have progressed rapidly while others continue to grapple with abject poverty. This study seeks to shed light on why inequality persists in the new South Africa by examining the budgetary process, law and policy-making in school districts; and the dynamics that influence the gap between the state's commitment and its actions. Ironically, the education system, which is meant to be an equalizing factor, highlights some of the most glaring remnants of Apartheid. I examine the constitution of South Africa regarding the government's proclamations and its limitations, using the Ehlanzeni District as a case study.

Notes

Session II, Panel 4 - Race & Education

Major

Politics

Award

Oberlin College Research Fellowship (OCRF)

Project Mentor(s)

Darko Opoku, Africana Studies
Eve Sandberg, Politics

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 28th, 3:30 PM Oct 28th, 4:50 PM

Public Education in the New South Africa: A Case Study on the Ehlanzeni School District

Science Center A154

Following the end of forty years of apartheid, South Africa's constitution sought to redress the injustices of Apartheid by promoting human rights and equality. Accordingly, the constitution committed the state to recognize the injustices of the past, improve the quality of life for all, and establish the foundations for a democratic South Africa. Some twenty years later, certain districts have progressed rapidly while others continue to grapple with abject poverty. This study seeks to shed light on why inequality persists in the new South Africa by examining the budgetary process, law and policy-making in school districts; and the dynamics that influence the gap between the state's commitment and its actions. Ironically, the education system, which is meant to be an equalizing factor, highlights some of the most glaring remnants of Apartheid. I examine the constitution of South Africa regarding the government's proclamations and its limitations, using the Ehlanzeni District as a case study.