Event Title

Swamped: Measuring and Mapping Food Access in Cleveland

Presenter Information

Mimi Stern, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Poster Number

3

Abstract

To better understand the proximity and inundation of food sources in different areas of Cleveland, we examined location-based accessibility and inundation of desirable and undesirable food sources with respect to income and racial composition. We compare the abundance of undesirable food sources (fast food, liquor, drug, convenience, and corner stores) relative to the presence of desirable sources (supermarkets, grocery, and specialty stores) within walking distance from each residential parcel in Cleveland. Using this data along with income aggregated by block groups, we identify generalized areas of food swamps and the disparities of food access between neighborhoods. We find that unhealthy foods are more readily-available than healthy foods in areas inhabited by a higher percentage of low-income populations or communities of color.

Major

Economics; History

Project Mentor(s)

Rumi Shammin, Environmental Studies Program
Paul Boehnlein, Applied GIS, Western Reserve Land Conservancy

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Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

Swamped: Measuring and Mapping Food Access in Cleveland

Science Center, Bent Corridor

To better understand the proximity and inundation of food sources in different areas of Cleveland, we examined location-based accessibility and inundation of desirable and undesirable food sources with respect to income and racial composition. We compare the abundance of undesirable food sources (fast food, liquor, drug, convenience, and corner stores) relative to the presence of desirable sources (supermarkets, grocery, and specialty stores) within walking distance from each residential parcel in Cleveland. Using this data along with income aggregated by block groups, we identify generalized areas of food swamps and the disparities of food access between neighborhoods. We find that unhealthy foods are more readily-available than healthy foods in areas inhabited by a higher percentage of low-income populations or communities of color.