Event Title

Metaphors We Think With: The Role of Metaphor in Reasoning

Presenter Information

Peace Iyiewuare, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Poster Number

49

Abstract

Metaphors are unique, as they possess the ability to pervade discussions of social and political issues and can directly influence the way in which we think, act, and comprehend complex and abstract problems. They express systematic connections between source and target domains. However, a major challenge for metaphor researchers is to empirically quantify the entailments of metaphors in order to make principled predictions about how metaphors affect reasoning and comprehension of the domains they describe. By way of a simple metaphorical comparison task, paired with a metaphorical framing task, we seek to reduce the reliance on researchers’ intuition when deriving hypotheses regarding metaphoric persuasion. In two/four experiments, we find significant levels of congruence between a metaphorical comparison task and a metaphorical framing task, thereby providing a principled method of empirically quantifying the persuasive capacity of metaphor frames.

Major

Psychology; Economics

Award

Oberlin College Research Fellowship (OCRF)

Project Mentor(s)

Paul Thibodeau, Psychology

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Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

Metaphors We Think With: The Role of Metaphor in Reasoning

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Metaphors are unique, as they possess the ability to pervade discussions of social and political issues and can directly influence the way in which we think, act, and comprehend complex and abstract problems. They express systematic connections between source and target domains. However, a major challenge for metaphor researchers is to empirically quantify the entailments of metaphors in order to make principled predictions about how metaphors affect reasoning and comprehension of the domains they describe. By way of a simple metaphorical comparison task, paired with a metaphorical framing task, we seek to reduce the reliance on researchers’ intuition when deriving hypotheses regarding metaphoric persuasion. In two/four experiments, we find significant levels of congruence between a metaphorical comparison task and a metaphorical framing task, thereby providing a principled method of empirically quantifying the persuasive capacity of metaphor frames.