Event Title

SNAP 2015: Analysis of Housepit 8, DkQi1

Presenter Information

Rachel Mead, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Poster Number

44

Abstract

The Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project (SNAP) is a First Nations site encompassing DkQi1 and DkQi2 on the banks of the Slocan River just north of Nelson, BC, in the traditional territory of the Sinixt Indian Band. Professor Nathan Goodale and Ms. Alissa Nauman have been working at the site for over a decade and almost every house in the pithouse village has been dated – the houses range from 2600 BP to 400 BP--but the field season of 2015 is the first time that a block was opened in Housepit 8. The pit was previously only classified as a cultural depression, but the artifacts and features found within the two meter by two meter square block suggest that there was, in fact, a dwelling at that location. The density of artifacts and soil coloration could indicate the presence of a hearth in the southwest unit, and more was recovered in this excavation than in almost any other housepit in the village. Lab work will focus on dating the hearth and floor, analyzing soil samples, and sourcing the fine-grained volcanic lithics. The excavators of Housepit 8 also recommend digging to the south and west of the 2015 excavation block in future seasons.

Major

Anthropology

Project Mentor(s)

Nathan Goodale and Alissa Nauman, Archaeology, Hamilton College

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

SNAP 2015: Analysis of Housepit 8, DkQi1

Science Center, Bent Corridor

The Slocan Narrows Archaeological Project (SNAP) is a First Nations site encompassing DkQi1 and DkQi2 on the banks of the Slocan River just north of Nelson, BC, in the traditional territory of the Sinixt Indian Band. Professor Nathan Goodale and Ms. Alissa Nauman have been working at the site for over a decade and almost every house in the pithouse village has been dated – the houses range from 2600 BP to 400 BP--but the field season of 2015 is the first time that a block was opened in Housepit 8. The pit was previously only classified as a cultural depression, but the artifacts and features found within the two meter by two meter square block suggest that there was, in fact, a dwelling at that location. The density of artifacts and soil coloration could indicate the presence of a hearth in the southwest unit, and more was recovered in this excavation than in almost any other housepit in the village. Lab work will focus on dating the hearth and floor, analyzing soil samples, and sourcing the fine-grained volcanic lithics. The excavators of Housepit 8 also recommend digging to the south and west of the 2015 excavation block in future seasons.