Event Title

Metal Organic Frameworks

Presenter Information

Daniel Mukasa, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Poster Number

41

Abstract

Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), being metal based crystalline structures, exhibit interesting properties when interacting with certain gasses. The main interest in these materials is their sponge like behavior, i.e. to hold many atoms without forming a chemical bond, similar to a sponge holding water. Understanding exactly how a MOF interacts with hydrogen could lead to a much more effective hydrogen fuel cell, one that does not require the high-pressure and heavy cylinders that are currently being used. This would enable hydrogen to be used to power cars and thus allow us to move away from the use of harmful gases as fuel. Unfortunately, current theoretical models cannot accurately simulate how a MOF behaves with various atoms. This leaves experimentation as the most practical way to improve the performance of these MOFs. Over the summer I worked in Professor Stephen FitzGerald’s lab with other Oberlin College students to analyze how MOFs interact with gasses, including hydrogen and nitrogen, at extremely low temperatures below 50K or -223 Celsius. By running our experiments at such low temperatures we allow the gases which enter the MOF to stick for a much greater time allowing for a more precise analysis of the interaction between the MOF and the gases presented.

Major

Math; Physics

Award

Science and Technology Research Opportunities for a New Generation (STRONG)

Project Mentor(s)

Stephen FitzGerald, Physics

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Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

Metal Organic Frameworks

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), being metal based crystalline structures, exhibit interesting properties when interacting with certain gasses. The main interest in these materials is their sponge like behavior, i.e. to hold many atoms without forming a chemical bond, similar to a sponge holding water. Understanding exactly how a MOF interacts with hydrogen could lead to a much more effective hydrogen fuel cell, one that does not require the high-pressure and heavy cylinders that are currently being used. This would enable hydrogen to be used to power cars and thus allow us to move away from the use of harmful gases as fuel. Unfortunately, current theoretical models cannot accurately simulate how a MOF behaves with various atoms. This leaves experimentation as the most practical way to improve the performance of these MOFs. Over the summer I worked in Professor Stephen FitzGerald’s lab with other Oberlin College students to analyze how MOFs interact with gasses, including hydrogen and nitrogen, at extremely low temperatures below 50K or -223 Celsius. By running our experiments at such low temperatures we allow the gases which enter the MOF to stick for a much greater time allowing for a more precise analysis of the interaction between the MOF and the gases presented.