Event Title

Natural Memories: Using Intergenerational Oral History to Teach about the Environment

Presenter Information

Ava Nicolai, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Poster Number

36

Abstract

This research investigates the potential of an environmentally focused intergenerational oral history program. The goal was to develop curricular materials for educating youth in oral history and interview techniques. Ultimately, the project will serve as a jumping off point for training youth in the Oberlin City schools to serve as Community Voices interviewers for the Environmental Dashboard. Through conducting a pilot program using these new curricular tools, this research illuminated the flaws and strengths of the lesson plan and of the relationship between oral history and environmental understanding. It has laid the groundwork for future developments that will build off the benefits of intergenerational sharing and learning. Survey data collected from students who participated in the pilot program will also help us to refine the instruments we use to study the Dashboard’s educational efforts. This research was also built off of the Oberlin Heritage Center’s long-term oral history project and has generated knowledge that will support the development of future programs for that organization.

Major

Environmental Studies; Studio Art

Award

Community-Engaged Research Fellowship (CERF)

Project Mentor(s)

John Petersen, Environmental Studies
Tania Boster, Bonner Center for Service and Learning
Liz Schultz, Oberlin Heritage Center

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

Natural Memories: Using Intergenerational Oral History to Teach about the Environment

Science Center, Bent Corridor

This research investigates the potential of an environmentally focused intergenerational oral history program. The goal was to develop curricular materials for educating youth in oral history and interview techniques. Ultimately, the project will serve as a jumping off point for training youth in the Oberlin City schools to serve as Community Voices interviewers for the Environmental Dashboard. Through conducting a pilot program using these new curricular tools, this research illuminated the flaws and strengths of the lesson plan and of the relationship between oral history and environmental understanding. It has laid the groundwork for future developments that will build off the benefits of intergenerational sharing and learning. Survey data collected from students who participated in the pilot program will also help us to refine the instruments we use to study the Dashboard’s educational efforts. This research was also built off of the Oberlin Heritage Center’s long-term oral history project and has generated knowledge that will support the development of future programs for that organization.