Event Title

Urban Gardens: Opportunities and Challenges for Ecosystem Services

Presenter Information

Dyaami D'Orazio, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Research Program

The Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program, University of Washington

Poster Number

29

Abstract

The P Patch Program is a city-sponsored community gardening program through the Department of Neighborhoods in Seattle, WA that promotes organic urban agriculture. It consists of 87 gardens and began in 1973 through the Picardo Family. P Patch partners with the Neighborhood Matching Fund, Lettuce Link, and local food banks to provide communities with access to food, a growing space, and other ecosystem services. Accessibility to resources such as food, seeds, water, and community may be limited or expanded based on income level, the amount of people in an area, or other factors. I evaluated the availability of water in certain Seattle community gardens, as well as evaluating the presence of other less tangible resources in these community spaces. Most broadly, my study asked what are the ways that community gardens facilitate access to ecosystem services and related resources for communities throughout Seattle?

Major

Environmental Studies

Project Mentor(s)

Martha Groom, Jin-Kyu Jung, Susan Waters, and Branden Born, College of the Environment, University of Washington

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Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

Urban Gardens: Opportunities and Challenges for Ecosystem Services

Science Center, Bent Corridor

The P Patch Program is a city-sponsored community gardening program through the Department of Neighborhoods in Seattle, WA that promotes organic urban agriculture. It consists of 87 gardens and began in 1973 through the Picardo Family. P Patch partners with the Neighborhood Matching Fund, Lettuce Link, and local food banks to provide communities with access to food, a growing space, and other ecosystem services. Accessibility to resources such as food, seeds, water, and community may be limited or expanded based on income level, the amount of people in an area, or other factors. I evaluated the availability of water in certain Seattle community gardens, as well as evaluating the presence of other less tangible resources in these community spaces. Most broadly, my study asked what are the ways that community gardens facilitate access to ecosystem services and related resources for communities throughout Seattle?