Event Title

The Development of Synthetic Pathways Towards Melanin Analogs

Location

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Start Date

10-2-2015 12:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 1:20 PM

Poster Number

28

Abstract

Melanins are some of the least understood biopolymers, but they have the potential to have a significant positive impact, potentially acting as water purification tools and organic semiconductors. Of the three different kinds of melanin, the type being studied in the Belitsky lab is eumelanin, the form that gives rise to black and brown coloration in hair and skin. Currently, the Belitsky lab is carrying out a series of reactions on functionalized indoles, compounds that when trimerized likely emulate the characteristics of eumelanin. Unlike eumelanin, these compounds are relatively easy to work with, meaning that they function as useful analogs of the biopolymer. This reaction series will hopefully help us better understand efficient synthetic pathways for this trimerization. Specifically, we are currently working on modifications of the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, such that we achieve coupling at the desired sites on the indoles.

Major

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Project Mentor(s)

Jason Belitsky, Chemistry

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Oct 2nd, 12:00 PM Oct 2nd, 1:20 PM

The Development of Synthetic Pathways Towards Melanin Analogs

Science Center, Bent Corridor

Melanins are some of the least understood biopolymers, but they have the potential to have a significant positive impact, potentially acting as water purification tools and organic semiconductors. Of the three different kinds of melanin, the type being studied in the Belitsky lab is eumelanin, the form that gives rise to black and brown coloration in hair and skin. Currently, the Belitsky lab is carrying out a series of reactions on functionalized indoles, compounds that when trimerized likely emulate the characteristics of eumelanin. Unlike eumelanin, these compounds are relatively easy to work with, meaning that they function as useful analogs of the biopolymer. This reaction series will hopefully help us better understand efficient synthetic pathways for this trimerization. Specifically, we are currently working on modifications of the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction, such that we achieve coupling at the desired sites on the indoles.