Event Title

Gestational Lead Exposure: Implications on Sleep

Presenter Information

Emilia Varrone, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center K209

Start Date

10-2-2015 4:30 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 5:50 PM

Research Program

Short Term Educational Experiences for Research in Environmental Science for Undergraduates (STEER), University of Pennsylvania

Abstract

Lead (Pb) is a potent toxin, which remains prevalent in our environment despite regulatory efforts. There is no safe limit of the element, and as Pb is still used in petrol in many developing countries, Pb still presents a major global health risk (WHO). Sleep disruption has been observed in a human cohort, and subsequently confirmed in a murine model. We exposed female mice to Pb two weeks prior to conception, thus offspring were exposed to lead throughout gestation and lactation. In these gestationally exposed mice, we identified neuron populations in critical sleep centers: the Locus Coerulus and lateral hypothalamus, and found the number and morphology of these cells are injured by lead exposure. We confirmed these injuries by showing that there are fewer orexinergic boutons in the cortex. Ultimately, sleep is a delicate physiological process: disruption of sleep can indicate underlying health problems. Learning what disrupts sleep, as well as how sleep disruption can affect or be affected by one’s health, is a potential diagnostic tool in the future of medicine.

Notes

Session III, Panel 8 - METALS: Health & Sustainability

Major

Neuroscience

Project Mentor(s)

Rebecca Simmons, Department of Pediatrics, and Sigrid Veasey, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Oct 2nd, 4:30 PM Oct 2nd, 5:50 PM

Gestational Lead Exposure: Implications on Sleep

Science Center K209

Lead (Pb) is a potent toxin, which remains prevalent in our environment despite regulatory efforts. There is no safe limit of the element, and as Pb is still used in petrol in many developing countries, Pb still presents a major global health risk (WHO). Sleep disruption has been observed in a human cohort, and subsequently confirmed in a murine model. We exposed female mice to Pb two weeks prior to conception, thus offspring were exposed to lead throughout gestation and lactation. In these gestationally exposed mice, we identified neuron populations in critical sleep centers: the Locus Coerulus and lateral hypothalamus, and found the number and morphology of these cells are injured by lead exposure. We confirmed these injuries by showing that there are fewer orexinergic boutons in the cortex. Ultimately, sleep is a delicate physiological process: disruption of sleep can indicate underlying health problems. Learning what disrupts sleep, as well as how sleep disruption can affect or be affected by one’s health, is a potential diagnostic tool in the future of medicine.