Event Title

Colorimetric Binding of Melanin-Inspired Coatings

Presenter Information

Lauren Choban, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center K209

Start Date

10-2-2015 4:30 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 5:50 PM

Poster Number

32

Abstract

Melanin, a widely recognized biological pigment, is a prevalent but poorly understood biomolecule. Melanin and its analogs are able to bind to metals such as lead and copper, which could lead to applications in water purification and metal detection. In the past, the Belitsky laboratory developed metal-binding discs that were coated using catechols, one type of synthetic melanin analog. Upon binding, these discs produce a discernable color change, which can be measured using quantitative colorimetry. Using this technique allows us to compare different types of catechol coatings and their binding affinities for various metal ions. Recent efforts involve the investigation of the structure and properties of a variety of catechol-based materials, with the aim of optimizing the responsiveness and selectivity of these discs for desired metals.

Notes

Session III, Panel 8 - METALS: Health & Sustainability

Major

Biology

Project Mentor(s)

Jason Belitsky, Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Oct 2nd, 4:30 PM Oct 2nd, 5:50 PM

Colorimetric Binding of Melanin-Inspired Coatings

Science Center K209

Melanin, a widely recognized biological pigment, is a prevalent but poorly understood biomolecule. Melanin and its analogs are able to bind to metals such as lead and copper, which could lead to applications in water purification and metal detection. In the past, the Belitsky laboratory developed metal-binding discs that were coated using catechols, one type of synthetic melanin analog. Upon binding, these discs produce a discernable color change, which can be measured using quantitative colorimetry. Using this technique allows us to compare different types of catechol coatings and their binding affinities for various metal ions. Recent efforts involve the investigation of the structure and properties of a variety of catechol-based materials, with the aim of optimizing the responsiveness and selectivity of these discs for desired metals.