Event Title

Deconstructing Racialized Discourse: Bridging Scholarship, Political Debate, and African American Student Achievement

Location

Science Center A155

Start Date

10-2-2015 3:00 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 4:20 PM

Abstract

America’s contemporary education debate tends to racialize where the blame for failing schools should go, particularly in urban areas. The black-white achievement gap demonstrates differences in test scores, retention and college readiness that perpetuate a stereotype of white students as a norm for educational success. As the nation continues to advance educational policy that undermines student achievement, particularly in communities of color, Latinx and African American communities are demonized as underperformers. Many scholars and community organizers are demanding radical changes in school structure that will close the achievement gap and promote Black student achievement. This research is concerned with illuminating how Black student achievement is often decontextualized and misinterpreted within mainstream education debate. In using discourse analysis, critical race theory and philosophies of African American achievement, this research hopes to contribute to the ongoing work of community-based, culturally relevant school reform occurring in Black communities across the nation.

Notes

Session II, Panel 4 - EDUCATION: Discourses & Institutions

Major

Africana Studies; Sociology

Award

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF)

Project Mentor(s)

Clovis White, Sociology

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Oct 2nd, 3:00 PM Oct 2nd, 4:20 PM

Deconstructing Racialized Discourse: Bridging Scholarship, Political Debate, and African American Student Achievement

Science Center A155

America’s contemporary education debate tends to racialize where the blame for failing schools should go, particularly in urban areas. The black-white achievement gap demonstrates differences in test scores, retention and college readiness that perpetuate a stereotype of white students as a norm for educational success. As the nation continues to advance educational policy that undermines student achievement, particularly in communities of color, Latinx and African American communities are demonized as underperformers. Many scholars and community organizers are demanding radical changes in school structure that will close the achievement gap and promote Black student achievement. This research is concerned with illuminating how Black student achievement is often decontextualized and misinterpreted within mainstream education debate. In using discourse analysis, critical race theory and philosophies of African American achievement, this research hopes to contribute to the ongoing work of community-based, culturally relevant school reform occurring in Black communities across the nation.