Event Title

Trying to Break Free: Capitalism's Hold on B-Boys & B-Girls

Presenter Information

Donnay Edmund, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A154

Start Date

10-2-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 2:50 PM

Abstract

People often think that black art forms are only a source of entertainment. However, throughout history, black art has been a way to detail our struggle. Black art is a reflection of the lives we have lived and the ones we wish we could. Black art has always provided a way to make a living in the racist, capitalistic U.S. My research focuses on b-boys and b-girls or "break dancers" in New York City and how it has been used as a means of economic survival. It will also address the criminalization of the art form and how this has resulted in the increase of poor and working class people in prison.

Notes

Session I, Panel 1 - CULTURE: Labor & Exploitation

Major

Africana Studies; Comparative American Studies

Award

Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF)

Project Mentor(s)

Adenike Sharpley, Africana Studies; Dance

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Oct 2nd, 1:30 PM Oct 2nd, 2:50 PM

Trying to Break Free: Capitalism's Hold on B-Boys & B-Girls

Science Center A154

People often think that black art forms are only a source of entertainment. However, throughout history, black art has been a way to detail our struggle. Black art is a reflection of the lives we have lived and the ones we wish we could. Black art has always provided a way to make a living in the racist, capitalistic U.S. My research focuses on b-boys and b-girls or "break dancers" in New York City and how it has been used as a means of economic survival. It will also address the criminalization of the art form and how this has resulted in the increase of poor and working class people in prison.