Event Title

The Revolution Starts at Home: Local Programming and Its Role in Resistances

Presenter Information

Amethyst Carey, Oberlin College

Location

Science Center A154

Start Date

10-2-2015 1:30 PM

End Date

10-2-2015 2:50 PM

Abstract

My previous research concluded that within a capitalist, neoliberal economy, profits have taken precedence over the needs of the low-income Black and Latinx students whom educational reform policies should be serving. I argue that concept can be accurately expanded to address the way that capitalism disproportionately disenfranchises low-income Black and Latinx communities as a whole. Consequently, my current research investigates how low-income communities have banded together to resist the effects of such a system. While many undoubtedly manifest within issues of educational access, these effects also arise in other areas, such as lack of access to food, lack of access to transportation, the incarceration of Black and brown low-income communities, etc. Using existing literature as well as interviews, this research aims to examine how communities are banding together to resist the disenfranchisement that accompanies a system where profits are more important than people. Subsequently, it hopes to use uncover ways these methods of resistance may be applicable to other communities in need.

Notes

Session I, Panel 1 - CULTURE: Labor & Exploitation

Major

Sociology

Award

Oberlin College Research Fellowship (OCRF)

Project Mentor(s)

Daphne John, Sociology

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Oct 2nd, 1:30 PM Oct 2nd, 2:50 PM

The Revolution Starts at Home: Local Programming and Its Role in Resistances

Science Center A154

My previous research concluded that within a capitalist, neoliberal economy, profits have taken precedence over the needs of the low-income Black and Latinx students whom educational reform policies should be serving. I argue that concept can be accurately expanded to address the way that capitalism disproportionately disenfranchises low-income Black and Latinx communities as a whole. Consequently, my current research investigates how low-income communities have banded together to resist the effects of such a system. While many undoubtedly manifest within issues of educational access, these effects also arise in other areas, such as lack of access to food, lack of access to transportation, the incarceration of Black and brown low-income communities, etc. Using existing literature as well as interviews, this research aims to examine how communities are banding together to resist the disenfranchisement that accompanies a system where profits are more important than people. Subsequently, it hopes to use uncover ways these methods of resistance may be applicable to other communities in need.